Back from holiday and lost that rosy glow? We know the feeling. Holidays can be a time to renenergise and refocus on our careers. But all that time also gives us space to think. And sometimes that space leads to career doubt.

Alice and Phanella from Step Up Club share some tips on dealing with the transition from sun lounger to desk and how to get back into the nine to five rhythm.

post holiday blues step up club

It’s important to recognise that the post-holiday blues are to be expected. It’s inevitable that shifting from lazy days by the pool or beach, cocktail in one hand and book in another will cause mixed emotions when you transition back to your normal routine. But how can you make things easier?

1. Don’t rush. We’ve all been tempted to take the last flight back on Sunday night before heading back to work Monday morning to maximise time in the sun. But the reality is that most of us struggle with such sharp transitions. Giving yourself a day or two to transition back before tackling a day at work is much kinder. Alternatively, come back mid-week. Two days are more manageable than a full week of work ahead.

2. Nurture yourself. On holiday, there’s no one to please but yourself. A weight lifts from your shoulders as you have nothing more stressful to consider than what YOU feel like doing next. Now bottle that feeling and bring some home in your luggage. Continue the focus on yourself by eating well, exercising and taking time out when necessary. Making sure the endorphins continue to flow when you’re back will increase happiness, motivation and success.

3. Acknowledge the change. Returning from holiday is like any transition. There’s a sense of loss and period of adjustment before we get back into the groove. Sure, it’s more likely to take a week than the 100 days it takes us to settle into a new job, but allow yourself to accept it’s a change nonetheless. Good things to do in periods of change: stay calm, focus on yourself. Less good: make decisions, come to conclusions. Save those big changes in your own career for when you’re fully back in the groove.