Fitness, 02.11.2016

Top 10 Calisthenics Exercises for Everyday Fitness

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If you ever feel like you’re sweating it out on the daily with no particular goal in mind, maybe it’s time to try a form of functional fitness called calisthenics. Mimicking the body’s natural movements, calisthenics are a series of mostly bodyweight exercises which require little to no equipment (read: can be done anywhere).

If you’ve been to any of instructor and personal trainer Keith Hahn’s classes here at Frame, you’ll already know the super toning benefits… Read on for his top ten calisthenics moves…

UPPER BODY

Pull Up (overhand grip): Hanging on an overhead bar whilst using your posterior chain (muscle groups behind you) to pull your body weight up to the bar.

Benefits: Full muscle recruitment/engagement, can be performed with different variations and levels of intensity, portable/convenient, V-shape, improves grip strength, accelerates fat loss and production of growth hormone.

Chin Up (underhand grip): Hanging on an overhead bar whilst using your anterior (muscle groups in front of you) and posterior chain (muscle groups behind you) to pull your body weight up to the bar.

Benefits: Develops full range of pull motion, can be performed in different variations and levels of intensity, strengthens biceps, portable/convenient, V-shape, improves grip strength, accelerates fat loss and production of growth hormone.

Press Up: Using your upper body to push your full body weight off of the ground whilst facing downwards.

Benefits: Develops full range of push motion (shortening and lengthening of the arms) off the ground, increases strength primarily in chest, triceps and core muscle groups.

Dips: Using your upper body to lower your body weight downward (arms at a 90 degree angle) whilst over a heightened area/bar.

Benefits: Develops full range of push motion (shortening and lengthening of the arms) off the ground, increases strength primarily in chest, triceps and core muscle groups.

LOWER BODY

Squat: Using your lower body to lower your body weight into a 90 degree sitting position whilst keeping your upper torso upright (chest up, shoulders back).

Benefits: Develops full range of motion for the legs (shortening and lengthening of the muscles), increases strength primarily in glutes and hamstrings.

Lunge: Using your lower body to position one leg forward (with the knee bent) whilst lowering the opposite back leg to the ground (knee to ground).

Benefits: Develops muscular strength and endurance, coordination and balance of the lower body muscle groups, increases strength primarily in glutes, hamstrings and quadriceps.

FULL BODY

Burpee: In one motion, lowering your body weight into an upright plank (legs extended) and then tucking your knees back to chest to standing position in one fluid explosive movement.

Benefits: Increases metabolic conditioning (fat-loss), improves strength in the upper/lower/core muscle groups and can be performed anywhere.

Mountain Climbers: Maintaining your body weight in an upright plank while alternating each knee to your chest at an efficient tempo.

Benefits: Increases metabolic conditioning (fat-loss), develops core strength (through tensing your core muscles throughout the exercise) and develops hip explosiveness (driving the knees to chest).

CORE

Leg Flutter: Using your lower body to tense your core whilst lying on your back, fully extending your legs outwards and alternating them up and down.

Benefits: Develops strength primarily in the lower part of the core, increases metabolic conditioning (fat-loss) and improves quadriceps strength.

Plank: Maintaining your body weight facing down while legs are fully extended and knees up (on elbows or hands).

Benefits: Develops strength primarily in the upper and lower parts of the core, increases metabolic conditioning (fat-loss) and improves quadriceps strength.

Up for more? Trying to nail your first (or 100th!) pull up? Book onto Keith’s Calisthenics Workshop this Saturday 5th November 2016 at Frame Shoreditch or visit one of his classes.

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